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weekly round-up

Originally published at Faith Seeking Understanding. You can comment here or there.

The Zimmerman verdict is in, and so perhaps a bit of time spent reliving simple pleasures is in order. I usually begin with articles and end up with funnies, but this week let’s switch that around.

Things I Laughed At:

Miscellaneous Funnies

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

=-=-=-=-=

Fannish Funnies:

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

10.

(Spoilers for Catching Fire trailer + Mockingjay book)

11.

12. (Not true, honestly, but only because I’m such a geek for RL history as well…)

13.

14.

15.

16.

=-=-=-=-=-=

Gender-Based Funnies:

1.

2.

=-=-=-=-=-=

Somebody’s Million-Dollar Idea

1.

2. It is perhaps telling that I file this under marketable ideas…

3.

4.

=-=-=-=-=-=

Cuteness

1.

2.

=-=-=-=-=-=

Deep Thoughts

1.

2.

3. I love that this writer shares her first name with a certain relative I love dearly, who I hope reads this (she does follow this blog) and knows it reminds me so much of her good character, which I hope I inherited in some small measure.

4.

=-=-=-=-=-=

Academic + Teacherly

1.

2.

=-=-=-=-=-=

Political Humor

1.

2.

=-=-=-=-=-=

Religion Humor

1.

2.

=-=-=-=-=-=

Nothing New This Week:

1. Because I’m a Closet Foodie
2. Groovitudes

*****************************

Things I’ve Read:

1. The Farm Bill and the Common Good, by Ross Douthat [NY Times]

Without a vision of the common good, a party is basically just a faction, seeking only the interests of its constituents, with no sense of its responsibilities to the country as a whole. And the Obama-era Republican Party’s worst tendency has been toward just this sort of factionalism: Not an ideological extremism, exactly, but rather a vision of government that you might call “small government for thee, but not for me,” in which conservatism is just constituent services for the most reliable Republican groups and voters.

2. Listening to Young Atheists: Lessons for a Stronger Christianity, by Larry Alex Taunton [Atlantic, h/t BioLogos]

Using the Fixed Point Foundation website, email, my Twitter, and my Facebook page, we contacted the leaders of these groups and asked if they and their fellow members would participate in our study. To our surprise, we received a flood of enquiries. Students ranging from Stanford University to the University of Alabama-Birmingham, from Northwestern to Portland State volunteered to talk to us. The rules were simple: Tell us your journey to unbelief. It was not our purpose to dispute their stories or to debate the merits of their views. Not then, anyway. We just wanted to listen to what they had to say. And what they had to say startled us.

3. Snowden, MOOCs and a Liberal Arts Education, by Tracy Mitrano [Inside Higher Ed]

Snowden never went to college. He has had his head in a computer since he was an adolescent, and it would appear has done little to lift it out whether working for the government or a third party vendor, recently to the tune of over $200,000 annual salary as a “system administrator.” That’s darned good money for a high school graduate. Still, I wouldn’t trade places with him for all the tea in Hong Kong. He is no Aaron Schwartz; he is not a martyr. Some of his behavior has aspects of a whistleblower, but not completely. A whistleblower wouldn’t and should not run. Shall we crown him with a civil disobedience laurel? Only if we want to sully that concept in our treasured history from Henry David Thoreau to Martin Luther King, Jr. I wonder if he knows who Henry David Thoreau is? Or the very rich history behind this iconic photograph. Has he ever had to write an essay on the Delphi’s admonition to “know thyself?”

4. A Universal Explanation for Religious Atheists, by Leonard Pitts

“You think it’s that simple? It’s not. Faith and doubt do not oppose each other. They define each other, like light and shadow.” […]

“Finding is important,” said God. “But seeking is important, too. Seeking teaches patience, opens your mind, shows you your own limitations. That’s where wisdom begins.”

5. How the West was Won… by Women, by The Smithsonian [author unknown]

In the realm of the popular mythology of the American West, food rarely comes to the fore. At most, we generally see a token saloon and the barkeep who keeps whistles wet but otherwise amounts to little more than set dressing. But the truth is, people who boarded a westward-bound train were able to eat pretty darn well. This was thanks to entrepreneur Fred Harvey, who launched a successful chain of restaurants (called Harvey House) along the Santa Fe railway and provided fortune seekers access to fine dining on the frontier. And at each location, patrons were served in the dining rooms by an elite force of waitresses known as Harvey Girls, a corps of women who helped settle the West and advance the stature of women in the workforce.

6. The New Thist, by Nathad Schneider [The Chronicle]

The students in Craig’s classes at Biola, it’s true, bear a kind of battle scar. A common story among them goes something like this: When they were teenage boys, growing up in evangelical households, their childhood faith began to buckle. Their classes in school and their classmates and the Internet posed questions they didn’t know how to answer. Their parents and pastors couldn’t help; they only recommended more prayer and faith, more blind-leaping. It didn’t work.

Then someone would lend them a book by William Lane Craig or J.P. Moreland, or send them a link to a debate on YouTube. All of a sudden, their questions were being taken seriously. They could chew on the latest science and philosophy while still going to church with their friends and families. They went to Biola to study philosophy or apologetics because they knew it would be a safe place to ask any question they needed to, with whatever rigor and detail they craved. Afterward they take the answers they get there back to their friends and to the Internet, and the entrepreneurs among them start apologetics ministries of their own.

They’re born again: rebaptized in philosophy.

*******************************

Things I’ve Said

Here:

1. It’s your birthday, it’s your stinking birthday… [birthday funnies]
2. he who has ears to hear… [Lord Harries' speech in the British Parliament on gay marriage, and my reaction to the same]
3. male and female he created them (on Jewish + Christian understandings of gender]

… and at FB:

1. 13-July @ 23:26

I picked up a bootlegged copy of Into Darkness yesterday on the subway. I do this occasionally for movies I want to rewatch but aren’t on DVD yet. I buy the DVD once it comes out, too, because I want to actually support the movie companies. Anyway, I was watching Star Trek this afternoon and i must say it’s grown on me. Still not as good as the original reboot, but the more I watch it, the less I notice the things that bothered me and the more I’m able to enjoy it on its own merits.

What I *really* like, though, is the soundtrack. I’ve come to really enjoy the way it mixes various themes.

2. 13-July @ 22:53

The Zimmerman verdict makes me rather sad. I honestly don’t know the law well enough to know if the decision was wrong. But based on the coverage I’ve seen, it seems clear to me that Zimmerman saw someone wandering around in the rain and rather than thinking he was lost he thought (actually, said) “these assholes always get away” – and then rather than letting the police handle it pursued him. And that the person he was pursuing ended up dead.

I don’t know what happened in the exact confrotnation, but it seems like Zimmerman set up a situation where an innocent person *could* be shot. And the fact that our court system presumes the accused person is innocent until proven guilty, but we don’t expect similar restraint from citizens confronting those people they suspect are criminals, before they’re prepared to use deadly force – something about that whole situation strikes me as very, very wrong. I just wish I was more surprised.

3. 13-July @ 21:53

I’m curious to anyone who saw “Pacific Rim”: what did you make of its whole treatment of religion and secularism? There’s only one or two explicit mentions of religion in it (and none of them in the slightest positive), but that isn’t news – I wouldn’t expect them in this kind of movie. But in some ways it seemed to be treating human accomplishment, particularly scientific accomplishment, as the end-all and be all. It even likens mathematics to the thoughts of God and allowas humans to transcend death through their own efforts. It didn’t have just the absence of religion (which I expect and am not bothered by, but also the *supplanting* of religion through the use of science and secular thought.

So I’m curious: first, did anyone else notice this, and second, what did you think?

4. 12-July at 22:43

I’m at MickeyD’s waiting on an ice cream and there’s a toddler wheeling around making the sound of a British police car and randomly punctuating it with Doctor Who catchphrases. Exterminate! Allonsy! Timey-Wimey! Banana! For some reason, this is really cracking me up.

5. 9-July at 23:27

So, the White House is trying to postpone an Obamacare position requiring companies over a certain size to provide insurance for workers. And the House GOP is resisting this move because it’s unfairly allowing companies to dodge responsibilities to workers.

This is the same House that has tried to repeal the ACA dozens of times.

And has such a stellar reputation of supporting govt action to ensure worker rights.

*head/desk*

Comments

( 3 comments — Leave a comment )
lindahoyland
Jul. 14th, 2013 07:22 am (UTC)
Thanks for sharing. These are most enjoyable.
shirebound
Jul. 14th, 2013 01:50 pm (UTC)
A most enjoyable round-up.

I need to teach my Pippin how to be a better Branch Manager.
dreamflower02
Jul. 14th, 2013 11:15 pm (UTC)
I’m at MickeyD’s waiting on an ice cream and there’s a toddler wheeling around making the sound of a British police car and randomly punctuating it with Doctor Who catchphrases. Exterminate! Allonsy! Timey-Wimey! Banana! For some reason, this is really cracking me up.

That would crack me up too, and sounds seriously adorable. Don't know the kid's parents, but I suspect I'd like them very much, LOL!
( 3 comments — Leave a comment )

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